The Benefits of Banning Books

...Sad Bear...

…Sad Bear… (Photo credit: ĐāżŦ {mostly absent})

Most librarians make a big deal out of Banned Books Week. They’re against banning books. They call it censorship.

I’m in favor of banning books. I call it marketing.

You’d be surprised at some of the books that get banned in some school districts, though perhaps not by the Texas State Board of Education banning Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See because they confused that book’s author, Bill Martin, Jr. with the author Bill Martin who wrote a book promoting ethical Marxism. I’m not for or against ethical Marxism, more than partially because I have no idea what it is, but I’m highly impressed by the educational leadership in Texas.

The Christian Science Monitor put together a nice list of 20 banned books that might surprise you.

I am in favor of banning books because a book being banned is just the thing to get a kid to read it. Okay, maybe not the dictionary. Not much of a story there (yes, some districts in California banned the Merriam-Webster Dictionary because it includes definitions of some sexual terms).

All a student needs to hear is that some parent or other authority somewhere doesn’t want them to read something because it might harm them in some way and there’s a rush to check it out of the library.

So thank you school boards, state departments of education, and other authorities that take the time and effort to promote literature in this highly creative way. You’ve done a great job!

Can I suggest some other titles you might want to take a look at?

Oh, you don’t have to read the books, just scan for the naughty bits and do your thing.

My circulation numbers need a boost.

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5 Responses to The Benefits of Banning Books

  1. I think this is 100% correct, even if ironic. The best thing to happen to a speaker is to be banned; same thing goes for books, rock starts, well, just about everything. More people read the Turner Diaries (unfortunately) after it got banned. Even books that express beliefs we fundamentally opposed should be allowed to circulate, and the ideas fought in the open marketplace of ideas

  2. Tourism Oxford says:

    Very clever.

  3. Precisely why I read Lady Chatterly’s Lover.

  4. Ellen L. says:

    So true – my son never read a book in school until The Giver – prob the most banned book in America – was assigned in middle school. A book that didn’t talk to kids like they’re morons and actually had something to say. No wonder so many people want to ban it…

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